The Best Ergonomic Furniture for Your Office

Young businesswoman relaxing leaning on comfortable ergonomic chair in modern office room, calm happy employee feels no stress free relief taking break to rest from computer work breathing fresh air

Golfers use different clubs on the fairway and the green. Runners don’t wear leather wingtips and heels during marathons. Their equipment suits their jobs and bodies to avoid injury and maximize performance. Why should office furniture be any different? Like a modern gym, outfit your office with ergonomic furniture so your team can be productive and healthy.

Ergonomic furniture isn’t just a fad with trendy companies replacing desks and chairs with standing desks and exercise balls. It’s an industry that designs business furniture with the human body in mind. Let’s explore the best, most diverse pieces of ergonomic office furniture and how they create more welcoming workstations.

Ergonomic Chairs and Accessories

Ergonomic furniture starts with good chairs. In a study from the National Center for Biotechnology Information, 219 out of 397 office workers reported lower-back pain over a month-long period. That kind of pain plummets productivity. By investing in adjustable, comfortable chairs, your office won’t dread sitting down for a long day.

High-Back Chairs

A padded high-back chair offers both cervical and lumbar support. The headrest keeps your neck straight while the memory foam back cradles your lower back. Combine that with large armrests for maximum posture support.

Mid-Back Chairs

Not everyone likes a large office chair. Mid-back adjustable chairs offer flexibility for office workers that fulfill diverse rolls. Contoured mesh backs provide lower- to mid-back support while adjustable arms keep your hands at a comfortable level in relation to your desk. They make great computer chairs and multi-purpose office chairs.

Standing Chairs

Standing chairs are increasingly popular ergonomic furniture choices. They allow users to sit with their legs stretched out, engaging the muscles and burning calories at their desks. They’re not for everyone, but people who use standing chairs often don’t go back to using normal office chairs.

Footrests

What’s the best accessory for a comfortable chair? A great footrest. Not just for lounging in front of the TV, a footrest under the desk encourages circulation and prevents cramps and tingly nerves.

Seat Cushions and Neck Pillows

If you change workstations throughout the day, consider investing in some cushions. Gel and memory foam cushions support your back, while cervical pillows keep your neck from suffering from office fatigue.

Ergonomic Desks and Accessories

With a new chair picked out, the next step is finding the perfect desk. With the proper measurements, many desks make your employees more comfortable, so here’s a handy desk measurement calculator to help! When choosing a desk, take arm length, height, and preferred monitor-viewing angle into account.

Desks with retractable keyboard shelves

This kind of desk allows keyboards to be at optimum lap height. With a retractable shelf, your keyboard can rest at the perfect angle for your arm length. Ergonomic desks with retractable shelves also allow for better cable management.

Adjustable desks

To facilitate most office roles, adjustable desks allow you to change the height and angle of your desk. This is especially useful for architecture, design and other roles that require putting hand to paper. Many adjustable desks feature large tops perfect for laying out a lot of visual information.

Standing desks

After a lunch break, using a standing desk allows improved digestion and blood-sugar control. Like standing chairs, they also allow for improved muscle engagement, circulation and burn calories all while staying at your desk. Many are adjustable and can be used as sitting desks, as well.

Monitor stands

Being too tall for the monitor at your desk can strain your neck. With a monitor stand, you can elevate your monitor to be in line with your eyes. Many allow you to adjust your monitor’s angle. Tired of losing pens and sticky notes on your desk? Many monitor stands feature storage shelves that keep your most-used items nearby.

Ergonomic Mats

Tile and even plush carpeting can be hard on the legs and feet. For standing desks or tall, customer-facing desks, an ergonomic mat relieves pressure on your joints, arches and calves. With a mat, you can prevent high-traffic areas around your office (like in front of printers and other communal technology) from wearing down.

Ergonomic Computer Accessories

Using uncomfortable keyboards and computer mice can worsen or cause arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome. These chronic illnesses make even easy days tough, not just physically, but mentally. A study published by the Mayo Clinic found that up to 50% of people with chronic pain suffer from anxiety disorders and depression. These may be relatively small pieces of ergonomic furniture, but they keep everyone happy.

Ergonomic Keyboards

Ergonomic keyboards are modern marvels. Some are built like waves, letting your hands rest on comfortable, rounded edges. Many split the keyboard in two, letting employees space them out for tactile comfort.

Ergonomic Mice and Mousepads

Like keyboards, ergonomic mice forgo standard boxy designs for hand-shaped edges. Instead of gripping a mouse like a brick for hours on end, your fingers will fall naturally over it. Pair it with a padded mouse pad to support your wrist.

Computer stands

Especially popular with the tech industry, a tall computer stand behind your desk allows easy access to your hardware. Many have shelves for computer towers and monitor stands. If your desk is frequently cluttered, a computer stand opens up valuable desk real estate.

Ergonomic Office Furniture From Indoff Commercial Interiors

At Indoff, we want to help make your office as healthy and productive as possible. Don’t sacrifice comfort for functionality. With our selection of ergonomic furniture, you’ll find a happy medium between utility and luxury. Contact us today for all of your ergonomic office and home office furniture needs in El Paso.

Home Office Or Return To Office?

Home office desk with computer, glasses against a bright window

We’re in mid-summer of 2021, and more than half of American adults are vaccinated, schools are starting to reopen, and states are lifting pandemic restrictions more and more every week. Yet, among all of this, more than half of the nation’s workers are still punching in and out of work from their homes, attending various Zoom meetings, and keeping it casual every day. However, some employers are pushing the return to the office in search of normality. 

How Some Companies Are Handling The Return To Office 

Large companies such as Goldman Sachs aim to have their employees back in the office at full force by the end of the year. Their CEO David Solomon has called their experience with remote work an “aberration” and “not a new normal.” JP Morgan wrote to their employees that their staff should be on a “consistent rotational schedule” by July. A recent survey done by Harvard Business School found that most remote employees miss the enjoyment of their co-workers and specific aspects of office life. 81% said they would want to stay working from home permanently or have a hybrid schedule with a few days working from home. Parents especially seem to want to return to the office compared to those without children, and married people were more eager than singles.

Many companies listen to their staff and try to find a proper balance between home and the office. Even before the pandemic began, a large portion of the workforce had meddled with the idea of a more remote or hybrid way of working. However, it took the pandemic for this shift in the workforce to occur, or else it may have never happened. 

So, it really varies on the company and how they want to get their office back up to speed as COVID seems to be under more control than a year ago. Even the CDC has issued a guideline to follow when returning to work

Why Go Back To The Office? 

There have been many pros to working from home. It was saving time and money on commuting back and forth, being able to raise a family a bit easier than leaving every morning, and the comfort of your home. It certainly has shifted perspectives for many. However, there are also obstacles that have not been overcome just yet. 

The sense of creating a culture as a remote company certainly has been one of the most difficult tasks so far. We tend to learn how to navigate a workplace by watching others’ interactions. In general, new hires have had a more difficult time getting things done, and it’s harder for managers to know when someone is having a hard time with a task. The sense of a company mission can easily fall away as you’re more separated from the team. Staying as engaged as possible has proven tricky and more time-consuming as we Zoom every meeting now. 

So, when it really comes down to what works better for your company, it might be time to have a meeting with your department heads and trickle down to your staff—understanding the pros and cons that each side is feeling and working your way through those obstacles. 

Revamp The Office As You Choose To Return or Stay Home!

Here at Indoff Commercial Interiors, we have plenty to choose from whether your staff is planning to return to the office or stay remote. Going back to the office gives your company a chance to revamp the way it was before—a new beginning for your team and how they can operate from a day-to-day office lifestyle. Bringing back a fresh sense of culture and aesthetic can be exactly what your team needs as they walk back in the doors. Contact us today to see how we can help you rebuild the office lifestyle.  

How to Create the Perfect Multifunctional Home Office

Multifunctional rooms and spaces have topped the charts of design trends in the past year. For every passing day, people have come to realize how helpful and important multifunctional spaces can be. Most working people have had to bring their work to their homes, finding ways they can fit their personal and professional life all in one space. With the help of modern office furniture, creating multifunctional rooms has become a simple task. How exactly can you mesh both comfort and focus in one corner? By following a few simple tips, you’ll have your bedroom, living room, and office all in one!

Choose a Room with Optimal Space

When you plan to combine a home office with your other home needs and activities, you’ll need to find a room that is able to serve several purposes. Space is something you’’ have to consider carefully. You don’t want to be tripping over electronics or toys if your office space will also occupy the game room. Choose a space that provides enough room for all your plans.

Keep Technology Needs in Mind

Whatever room you choose to occupy your office space in, you will have to plan ahead when it comes to technology. For example, you’ll want to provide enough power supply for your computer setup, a television (if there is one in the same room), and other appliances that require an outlet. You should also account for other appliances you may have such as mini-fridges or others.

Choose a Desk that Accommodates Your Needs

The desk that you choose for your multifunctional office should have just enough space for your computer setup and tools and also additional space for other purposes. You could also designate one half of your desk for the computer and the other half for note-taking and filing. This can help your productivity and organization.

Make the Space Comfortable

Since you’ll be combining your office space, it’s important to consider comfort and relaxation just as you would in any other room! Let’s start with the office chair. As opposed to using a stiff and more traditional office chair, you could use a piece of furniture that is both a lovely living room finish and a productive tool!

Choose Furniture that Has Plenty of Storage

You’ll be thinking about how much room you have during this process, therefore, you’ll also have to consider how much furniture you can incorporate. It is best to choose furniture that provides enough storage to prevent clutter and to help with keeping things organized. Furniture that offers storage can also help when it comes to keeping your space multifaceted.

Lighting: Make it Just Right

As we’ve mentioned before, when it comes to multipurpose rooms, you want to make sure it’s just as comfortable as it is productive. Some offices have lighting fixtures that are too uncomfortable to bear. When you’re at home, you want to relax and wind down. For a multifunctional home office, you’ll need a little bit of both to achieve productivity!

Make Sure to Leave Room for Other Purposes

Creating a home office doesn’t really require much space. In fact, all you need is a corner with just enough for a desk, a seat, and other tools you may have. With that being said, if you’re trying to create a multifunctional workspace, you don’t want to go overboard with the office furniture. Planning ahead and laying out your furniture may help.

Dress it Up to Your Liking

Of course, you should always have fun with the process of building your multifunctional office space! Don’t be afraid to throw in some vibrant-colored curtains, a notice board, and other materials that speak your aura. This can encourage your workflow at home if you have trouble focusing outside of the traditional office space. In addition to productivity, you should enjoy working in a home office.

Throw in Some Green

It is proven that having plants or natural elements around can decrease levels of stress during your workday. Not only does having a plant help you manage overwhelming sensations, it can also help you feel more at home and dresses the space up to be more multifaceted.

Contact Indoff Commercial Interiors Today!

The experts at Indoff Commercial Interiors is proud to provide El Paso locals with their professional needs, especially during these unprecedented times. If you’re looking for specific materials or furniture for your office space, don’t hesitate to contact us today.

Getting Your Office Back Up To Speed: Work & COVID-19

If your office is like thousands of offices across the globe, you may have elected to work from home sometime during the coronavirus pandemic. The virus that took the world by storm nearly a year ago is beginning to wane in many parts of the world, so now offices are beginning to allow people back in.

But you don’t want to simply bring people in without a plan. If you don’t have some sort of plan in mind, you’ll likely end up with people in your workplace getting sick and your office shutting down once again. So how should you bring your employees back to work in a safe way?

In this blog, we’ll discuss tips that you can use to keep your employees healthy and productive!

Let Everyone In On The Sanitation Plan

This should be a no-brainer but so many companies unnecessarily leave their employees out of the loop. Your office’s response to the coronavirus should be clear to everyone who needs to follow it. Make sure none of the plan is vague, either.

Stay Patient

Often when companies experience crunch, the gut reaction from management is to crack down and pressure people to perform. This is absolutely not the way that you want to bring your people back.

If some of your employees seem a little sluggish, don’t be so quick to get rid of them. Propose an action plan and give

Create An Action Plan

In addition to having a sanitation plan, you’re going to need to have a plan for all departments to get back up to speed. Of course, this plan is going to be highly dependent on how your business has handled this period. If productivity has been lacking, then you may need to be aggressive with your plan.

Conversely, if your business has handled the pandemic well, you shouldn’t push too hard. This is for reasons that we’ll expand on in the next tip. Most importantly, be sure to balance the needs of the company with the needs of your employees.

Create A Support Network

Modern life even before COVID-19 was incredibly hectic and stressful for millions of Americans. Our current pandemic has only added more instability to an already precarious economy and social fabric. As a result, a support system at work could keep people from burning out completely or being unproductive.

This support network can be configured in a number of ways. It could be something as small as encouraging employees to reach out to each other to make a therapy program.

Consider Socially Distanced Activities

Chances are that when you go back to the office, morale won’t be so high. It’s natural, everyone has a lot on their mind, so try to think up some activities or fun incentives for a morale boost. Perhaps a fun office activity with a cool prize, or a surprise doughnut break for the team.

These activities can be tailored to your business’s specific situation. Just don’t forget to get creative and try to get everyone on the same page.

Tell Employees To Leave Work At Work

Even if offices say not to work from home, most probably secretly love when their team decides to knock something out at home. People may be even more inclined to work from home since they have been doing it for a while. But you may need to really emphasize that the work needs to stay in the office.

This is because of the stress and burnout that we mentioned earlier. With everything that is going on, it could be easy for your employees to overwork themselves and burnout. When your employees come in, just try to stress that they need to stop the work when they clock out.

Trust Indoff For Your Office Furniture!

Regardless of how you bring employees back, they’ll need a place to sit ad work. That’s where we come in. Indoff supplies the best in office furniture and equipment to support our El Paso customers.

Contact us today to learn more about our office offerings!

Office Space Design: Getting Your Office Furniture to Work for You 

a group of young employees collaborating in a shared work space

Research into how we work is nothing new. First, there were factory floors, then large office spaces that resembled factory floors, then cubicles, then the revolution against cubicles, then the technology and internet age. Every step of the way business executives and heads of major companies have been trying to figure out a way to improve the way we work. A big part of improving productivity and increasing collaboration lies in the way that people’s workspace is arranged, although not many companies consider this as an asset or tool for growth. Here at Indoff Office Furniture, we understand that the office is not just the place we arrive at in the morning with coffee stains on our shirt, our hair undone, and flustered from the morning commute. The office space needs to be so much more than that. 

Many startups and tech companies today are trying innovative ways to propel their workforce to improve workflow. Sometimes it feels like they are at odds with themselves. After all, the office is not one dimensional. Here at Indoff Office Furniture, we understand that. We see the office as a place that should inspire creativity but also encourage comfort; it is a place that lends itself to quiet solitude and focus but also makes interaction and collaboration easy. The office space should do all these things while maximizing space and suggesting a feeling of modernity and coziness. 

Let’s take a step back, where did all this begin?

The roots of the office design were born out of necessity. As the white-collar age began, many big-time company execs understood that housing all of their employees in one building could present a series of problems but also opportunities. During the turn of the 20th century, Taylorism was born and would today be looked at with some scorn. The office layout consisted of a fully open layout with all employees laid out in one big room as company executives looked on from above the way that factory floors were often structured. This creation of hierarchy and separation would not bode very well today but the movement was deemed Taylorism, after Frederick Taylor, who was obsessed with productivity and efficiency. The levels were soon done away with and the arrangement became more utilitarian by the mid-50s, although much of the space still remained relatively open. Later in the 20th century, Herman Miller created the Action, a semi-personal workstation that created dividers between workers but gave enough space for some conversation. This little station has gained quite the reputation and has in some ways become synonymous with the drone and tedium of modern life, yet it did change the way that office space was conceived for many years. This is, of course, the cubicle. 

The Move Towards Collaborative Spaces Using Furniture and Space Arrangement 

The modern age has us not only working with technology but working to further technological advancements, services, software, and more. Regardless of what your office works on or develops, the space where your workers attack the problems and challenges must be conducive to a better work environment. 

Approaches to Better Office Design and Increased Productivity 

See your office design and furniture as tools for growth. For the modern age, this might include re-engineering office space to encourage interactions and communication between different departments or types of employees. Let the developers mingle with the designers, let the creatives watercooler-talk with the salespeople, and let the managers interact free with their teams. This happens simply by re-thinking the way our spaces are laid out. In terms of furniture, it might include using different types of desks in one area and other more private cubbies in another. 

Use furniture as a way to set the tone and create comfort. There are so many more options today than simple cubicles or bland desks that tend to create clutter. One thing that does increase people’s stress is the clutter that begins to form when the arrangement of the room is not conducive to storage or the maximizing of space. Today’s office furniture offers a lot of interesting alternatives, many of which can increase employees’ comfort level and set different tones for different rooms. Technology companies like Google—who have truly revolutionized the office space— have found that productivity happens in a spectrum, so they have designed different rooms to be conducive to different types of work, from solo work to semi-quite focused areas, to full open collaborative spaces. 

Indoff Office Furniture is meant to help you maximize and reengineer your office space in a way that inspires your employees to be more productive, comfortable, and happy at work. 

 

How The Color Of Your Workplace Affects Productivity

An animated office with glass windows, conference room, computer tables, with plants and hanging lights.

There’s so much we do to set up the perfect workspace. From the right kind of coffee to kick-start your day, to finding that perfect chair for posture. But have you ever thought about the color scheme you’re surrounded by? Studies have shown that your office paint job can affect you more than you realize. A study done by Color Psychologist Angela Wright proves to show how color can change your mindset. It’s time to reanalyze your efficiency and optimize your productivity. If you’re working from home or heading back to the office soon, here’s how changing the color of your workspace can change how you work.

Color = Productivity

Before you jump up and pick your favorite color for your workplace (let’s not break out the neon scheme just yet), you should know what individual colors mean. Think about it from an artist’s perspective. They pick certain colors to bring out specific moods and emotions in their work. If they’re creating a calming spring meadow, they’re not going to use Hi-Fi reds and oranges. They’ll aim for blues, greens, even some yellows to relax your mind. Let’s look at some of the primary colors and their effects on the mind. 

modern working office with efficient colorful walls and carpeting to enhance productivity

Red: Stimulating And Attention Grabbing

Although stimulating, the color red has its pros and cons for the work environment. Think of a stop sign – it catches our attention immediately. It’s also probably what your teacher used when marking up that paper you spent all night working on. Mostly, it’s a call for attention in the details. It raises our blood pressure and can activate our “fight or flight” instinct. Although the color red isn’t recommended for a relaxing workplace, it’s productive when drawing one’s attention to a key item. It also has two ways on the spectrum it can land on – pink and burgundy. Pink has a light-hearted feel, whereas burgundy takes a sophisticated and serious tone. The verdict? Use it sparingly or just to highlight something important in the office.  

Blue: Productivity and Calming

Quite the opposite of red, and known for its calming ability, blue has the most significant productivity boost in the office. If you use blue as the base color for office productivity, you can use other colors as accents since so much goes well with the color. It has the opposite effect from red as it lowers the blood pressure. Creating a calming feeling, it aids the mind for concentration at its fullest. 

Green: Relaxing and Peaceful

Hitting that 40-hour workweek can be exhausting no matter what you do. Luckily, green has a significant effect on calming people down. It’s key to relaxation, mainly because green doesn’t strain the eyes. It’s no wonder offices have open windows with plenty of nature surrounding them. You can even place plants around the office to help create this effect as well. It’s perfect for keeping your mind at peace for those overwhelming projects and deadlines.

Yellow: Collaboration and Optimism 

As much as we love being relaxed and cozy, too much can put us to sleep. A touch of yellow can bring in some energy and positive emotions into the office space. If you want to highlight collaboration, yellow can help to bring out an uplifting and vibrant mood. It’s also known for stimulating creativity and optimism. Although, too much can be an oversaturation. It’s known as the least favorite color for most adults, so use it sparingly and in key spots.

Group of joyful and cheerful coworkers sitting together in bright creative office and laughing while discussing launch of new project of company

Working From Home

 So, you’ve set-up your at-home office, probably in a room that wasn’t used much before. Or maybe, you’re in the center of everything in your living room. You probably went from spending your early mornings and evenings at home, but now you’re there all day. Take a step back and see what color fits both your living and home working situation. You’ll find it makes a more significant influence than you realize.   

Back To The Office 

As a business owner, most of your staff might be working from home right now, and that’s okay. It has its pros with everyone out of the building. Now is the perfect time to renovate the office space a little. This doesn’t mean you need to break out the paint buckets either, you can do all of this with furniture as well. Not everyone has the luxury of owning a building or the budget to paint every wall and room in the office. By simply updating the furniture, you can make the entire room come to life.

Also, remember that each color’s tone and brightness take a big part of what you’re choosing. You don’t want to oversaturate your office or pick the wrong color for the wrong room. Our leader, Kim Gregory, can help you decide what message and vibe you’re sending not only to your clients but to your people.

More Than Just A Color  

A key thing to remember is the intensity and saturation of each color. Selecting colors in key spots means more than a whole room one color. The CEO having a blue highlighted door can mean trustworthiness and dependability. Green plants bring in freshness and nature into the office, and so on. So, before picking that basic beige or white walls, think about how you can truly optimize productivity with your color schemes. 

The History of the Office: Where Productivity and Creativity Flourish

a modern open office space with plants and white office furnitureOffices have a long, storied past. It’s where great deals are made, and where world-changing inventions come to life. But how did we arrive at the modern office? And where are offices going in the future? Today, we’ll delve into the history of the modern office to see if we can uncover any secrets to this crucial piece of modern society. If you’d like to convert your office into a more efficient, comfortable, and professional space, then Indoff Office Furniture can help.

The Origins of the Office

Here’s a fun fact, did you know famed English author Geoffery Chaucer is credited as the first person to use the term “office” as a place where business transactions take place? This was way back in 1395, appearing in Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. Prior to this, the term was generally used when referring to a position that involved certain duties. 

We can find the true birth of the modern office in the 18th century when the East India Company and other large-scale, complex organizations began to grow and take hold of the world. It was during this time that the first office spaces were being built. These buildings were built with the sole purpose of getting work done. 

Productivity³ 

At the core of every office is the need for productivity to thrive. This need gave birth to the office cubicle. In 1964, office equipment company Herman Miller teamed up with industrial designer Robert Propst to create a concept of a “modern” office that would fight against the monotony of past office spaces, thus allowing for higher degrees of creativity to flourish. What they came up with was known as the “Action Office,” a precursor to the modern cubicle. Today, the cubicle is seen in a less-than-flattering light but its original intention was to create a private setting where employees could work without distraction, thus letting their creativity and productivity flow. 

Japan in the 20th Century: Birthplace of the First Open Plan Offices 

One the other side of the spectrum is the 20th-century Japanese office. Japanese offices pioneered what is known as an “open plan” which mostly relies on ergonomic decisions that aid in making employees as productive as can be. Unlike most American offices, Japanese offices have no walls dividing desks or cubicles; individual offices are also eschewed in this open floor plan. In order to ensure productivity, the office or group leader sits at a prominent position. From this spot, the leader can assign tasks and keep tabs on work as its completed.

Since this open-plan does away with walls, team members are able to speak freely with one another in case they require assistance or guidance. If this sounds like your current office layout, then you’re in good company! It wasn’t long before the open office plan pioneered by Japanese businesses began to crop up in other offices all across the world. 

Working from Home

There are countless industries in this world of ours. As such, some industries may benefit greatly from open plans while others are actually more beneficial with cubicles or team spaces. It all depends on the particular industry. But with the advent of the internet and the turn of the century, offices actually evolved to become more personal. So much so, in fact, that many individuals have gone on to work from home.

Everyone, from architects and freelancers to therapists and photographers, has made the move to home offices. Although there is still a prestige that comes along with a physical office address, there’s unbridled freedom that comes from working at home. In fact, many modern companies have remote workers who live in different cities or countries. All this can be done thanks to the advancements in technology and internet connectivity. 

Coworking Spaces Explained

Coworking spaces are an interesting development in the trajectory of office spaces. Sometimes, working from home just isn’t in the cards. Perhaps you don’t have an extra room to spare or your family is much too loud for you to properly speak with clients over the phone without interruptions. This is where coworking spaces can come in handy. Coworking spaces seamlessly combine the idea of open-plan offices with the premise of remote work. For low monthly rates, you can have your own desk in a modern, state-of-the-art office.

Coworking spaces are incredibly popular among freelancers, start-ups, and entrepreneurs so you’ll be in good company. In fact, that’s one of the main benefits of coworking spaces. Since like-minded individuals are all around you, you’ll be able to flourish in your own endeavors. Coworking spaces create a unique environment. You’re your own boss, but you’re not on your own. You can take time to speak with those around you and bounce ideas off one another and there won’t be a supervisor keeping tabs on your tasks. As such, creativity can flourish!

Finding the Right Furniture

Whether you’re planning on converting your spare bedroom into your home office or you’re ready to start renting a space for your startup, you need to make sure you have the right office furniture to guarantee productivity, comfort, and organization. This is where Indoff Office Furniture comes into play. We carry the best of the best in business and office furniture. Give us a call today to learn more about what we have to offer!

Myths of The Open Office Concept

Employees working together in modern open office space, corporate group team employees using computers, talking, discuss project, colleagues in coworking, collaboration, teamwork

Since the 70s, the open office concept has gained lots of traction. In fact, in America, it’s estimated that 70% of all office spaces were open office concepts of some degree. Championed by businesses like Facebook and other Silicon Valley giants, the open office was supposed to be the creative, collaborative workspace of the future. The problem—open offices have done just the opposite. 

In this article, we’ll discuss some of the pitfalls of such a system, as well as discuss potential alternatives. 

Open Office Lack Of Creativity 

It’s rare when a concept does the exact opposite of what it was intended to do; unfortunately, that’s what we have with open offices. 

According to a 2018 Harvard Business Schol research paper, open offices reduced face to face interactions drastically, promoting emails and instant messages (IMs) more. Perhaps more importantly, workers were less productive, efficient, and quality fell to boot. 

Other studies have shown decreases in creativity, productivity, job satisfaction, and attention spans. In an era where everyone’s attention spans are decreasing, the last thing a business needs is even less attention from employees.

If that wasn’t enough, higher stress levels, blood pressure, and job turnover are also associated with open offices. Not quite the office revolution that people were hoping for. 

So…Now What?

So cubicles are drab, but open offices are bad in almost every way. What do we do? Well, as with most things in life, the best option may be somewhere in the middle. Some companies are utilizing open office design in small groups. Each group will have its own sequestered space but will be able to collaborate amongst themselves. This boosts productivity and collaboration without having the noise of the entire office distracting them. 

Getting the Most Out of Your Office With Indoff

If you want the most productive office space for you and your staff, you’ll need to get the best equipment for your staff. Here at Indoff, we ensure that our collection of office furniture and equipment is of quality design and functionality. Contact us today to find the best office furniture for your goals! 

 

Reupholstering Office Furniture: 3 Ways Your Business Will Benefit

reupholstering

Throwing out old furniture is easy but so is sending it to be reupholstered. Unfortunately, many offices aren’t aware of this option. That’s why we’re here to advocate on this easily attainable option. 

Reupholstering office furniture isn’t just for broken pieces either. That is also a common misconception. The reality is all types and conditions can be repurposed. Let’s say your office is going through a makeover and the color of your conference room table doesn’t look great against the new paint on the walls. Our team can paint it a different color. 

The idea behind reupholstering to give great materials a second life. When a piece of furniture has a solid foundation — it’s built well and of high-quality material — there’s no reason to discard it. As a business, you will be at an advantage when you choose to have your furniture reupholstered. 

Here’s how your team will benefit: 

1. Cost and Good ROI

Ultimately, you want to save money on office furniture. We completely understand! To put the cost of reupholstering vs. buying new furniture into perspective consider this: a large sofa can cost upwards of $1,500 while having it reupholstered generally costs roughly $400. Of course, these numbers will depend on the quality of the materials but on average you’re looking at half the cost when you choose to reupholster.

Moreover, reupholstering a well-made chair or bookshelf is a great return on investment. The piece will return to working condition, maybe even better than before, and it will last you another seven to fifteen years. When you have a piece that needs a minor repair, it’s absolutely worth having it repaired.       

2. Implementing a ‘Fix It’ Mentality

Reupholstering at its core is about having a fix-it mentality. As opposed to discarding something because it has a crack or minor dent, you see fix it as an opportunity to give it new life. By demonstrating to your team that things are worth fixing, they too will begin to see the value in not just material possessions but intangible things as well.  

3. Improving the Environment

Whether this is your primary reason for repurposing furniture or you didn’t initially realize the value, by giving your furniture a second life, you will be doing a service to the environment. You will help reduce waste one office furniture piece at a time. Even if you’re not able to fully salvage the piece, there are materials on your furniture that can be turned into something else. When you bring us your old or broken furniture, we’ll give it a purpose!

Let Us Transform Your Office Furniture! Contact Indoff Commercial Interiors Today

Do you have a couple of items hanging around in the corner because they’re broken? Or maybe you made the mistake of buying that green chair that looked blue in the catalog. Whatever the case may be, we’re ready to give it new life. 

Contact Indoff Commercial Interiors in El Paso today!

Tips for Optimal Workplace Productivity

woman being productive at workDo you find yourself taking work home, wondering why you couldn’t get done at work? So many of us do! The reality is — there are only so many hours in a day and time can easily get bogged down with small, often unproductive tasks. Being productive requires work. It requires strategic planning and most all, it requires discipline. It’s easy to arrive on time (or even early) and have your day’s plans get thrown out the window with one interruption, which often leads to another. By the time you know it, it’s 5 o’clock.

But being productive isn’t necessarily a science. There are small but effective changes you can begin applying that will cut down five minutes then ten, 20, and eventually, you will find yourself with an extra hour to accomplish those tasks you’ve put off for a lack of time.

Here are 7 effective strategies to being more productive at work that you can easily begin applying today:  

1- Track Your Time

Do you know how long you spend in the break room getting coffee each morning? What about the time it takes to send out emails to your staff or replying to those emails? If you’re not currently tracking your time, it’s time to start today! Estimates don’t count. And if you’re thinking won’t tracking my time take time? It will only take TWO MINUTES out of your entire day to track what you’re working on every 30 minutes. We suggest starting off with the 30-minute interval. This way you can get into the habit of checking in with yourself every 30 minutes. Once you get used to jotting down what it is you’re working on, you can extend it to an hour or every time you change tasks. There are tools like Rescue Time that make it easier to track specific tasks including checking email, talking to coworkers, going to the bathroom, and meeting with clients, all of which make up your entire day.

2- Always Take Breaks

Okay now you’re probably thinking so in addition to tracking my time, you want me to take breaks? The simple answer is yes. While it sounds counterintuitive, taking breaks will help improve your concentration. Keep in mind, these breaks should be short. You also don’t want to take too many frequent breaks. Rather, every 90 minutes take a small productive break. What do we mean by productive? We mean, grab some coffee, go to the bathroom, stretch, take a “smoker’s break” even if you don’t smoke. Essentially you want to use this time to step away from work and reconnect with how you’re feeling. Give your eyes a screen break and your body a reboot.

3- Place Deadlines on Yourself

Ah, deadlines. Whether you love or hate them, deadlines help us stay on pace and they give us the right type of stress. By setting self-imposed deadlines on yourself, you’ll be able to stay focused on what needs to be accomplished and by when. Deadlines will also give you the ability to visualize a finish line. In return, your time will be planned out. Many people are surprised at how self-imposed deadlines force them into mini-athletes where it’s them vs. time. Be realistic about how long tasks should take and also don’t afraid to challenge yourself to some more strict deadlines.   

4- Avoid Multitasking

Multitasking can essentially decrease productivity. How is that so? It’s been found that multitasking results in lost time because people cannot devote their energy to competing tasks. For example, the old cliche and driving while putting on your makeup. This can easily result in an accident. There are some tasks that can be done in unison but you want to make sure they don’t compete with one another. For example, while you can’t put on makeup and look at the road, you can drive and mentally plan out your day or visualize what it is your day will entail. Remember to remain positive about it. Visualize being the most productive possible.   

5- Minimize Interruptions

Interruptions are inevitable but do your best to let others know that what you’re working on is time-sensitive. When your colleagues respect your time, they’re less likely to interrupt you. If you have your own office, close the door to tackle those projects. You also want to consider mapping out your time to meet with people. Resist the temptation to give away your time as this often leads to staying late in an effort to make up for it or taking work home.

6- Stay Motivated and Determined

Motivation is the key to all of these tips. You know yourself and you know your work habits. Add in determination and you’ll see that work is feasible. Don’t allow feelings of worry to take over. Even if you know something may not get done “on time,” knowing it needs to be accomplished, just get to work on it! Eliminate all feelings of doubt and productivity will follow.

7- Keep Your Energy Level High

Once you have time management down, it’s all about your energy. Your energy level is essential to not only remaining productive at work but also outside of work. We’re not robots. We require exercise, connecting with friends and family, and doing the things that motivate us. Where does your source of energy come from? It may be your morning run, a 10-minute meditation, or a mid-day walk. No matter how you get energized, make sure to prioritize these rituals. They matter your mind and body.

“Action Expresses Priorities.” — Gandhi

How you choose to spend your time says a lot about who you are and what your goals are. We are given the same hours in a day but how we spend those hours will determine our legacy. What do you want your legacy to be?